Goodreads for Authors now available as a paperback

My ‘Goodreads for Authors’ book is now available as a paperback. Amazon.com – http://amzn.com/1482689960 Amazon.co.uk – http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/1482689960 Amazon.de – http://www.amazon.de/dp/1482689960. This edition is in English. It is currently being translated into German. Sign up for free updates here: http://www.michellebooth.net/goodreads-for-authors-updates/. Things change frequently on Goodreads!   You may also like:Goodbye To ColaBook Review: Get Off Your...

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Goodreads for Authors course – whatever your learning style

Back in the day, I used to assess the students at the school I taught in to discover their brain’s preferred learning style. They were generally split fairly equally – a third preferred visual learning (they need to see things in order to understand and remember them), a third preferred auditory learning (they needed to hear things in order to understand and remember them), and a third preferred kinaesthetic learning (they needed to move in order to understand what they were being taught, and remember it). Kinaesthetic learners have been poorly served in many classrooms for years. It just isn’t practical much of the time. Modern learning methods – especially online learning – have made great efforts to cater for all three main learning styles though. Digital courses can be controlled by the learner (making the kinaesthetic brain pay more attention), and can be seen (static images, writing, and video), and heard. If you are relaxed and feel in control of your learning, and that learning caters to your brain’s preferred style of learning, you are much more likely to enjoy what you’re learning, understand it better, and remember it. This helps everyone but especially the poor kinaesthetics, who have had to sit on their hands on classrooms for years! I have been working hard to turn my book, ‘Goodreads for Authors’, into a digital course. I was fortunate to meet the very talented Cathy Presland, who has numerous digital courses available on the Udemy platform. She taught me the ropes and we created the course together. Anyone joining the course gets lifetime access to its 7+ hours of instruction and it’s on a great, no pressure, dip-in-dip-out platform. That means you can just log in to get the information you need when you need it. If you join, you’ll be able to ask us questions and receive quick answers, and will also be eligible for membership of our private Facebook group for authors. The group is fun, we all help, encourage, and promote each other, share tips and ideas, and discuss what’s working and what’s not in the ever-changing world of digital book promotion. I hope you can join us. https://www.udemy.com/goodreads-for-authors-book-promotion-and-marketing/     You may also like:Writing SoftwareMo The Talking Dog Is...

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Is Goodreads good for non-fiction authors?

The question I get asked the most is, ‘Is Goodreads good for non-fiction authors?’. The perception is that the site is heavily fiction-biased. So I took a few minutes to have a look at the groups, Recommendations Engine, and Giveaways to get some up-to-date figures. There are 272 groups with a tag of ‘non-fiction’ and the Recommendations Engine serves up loads of non-fiction books as suggestions if you have a non-fiction shelf. The Giveaways section is also interesting. It has more fiction than non-fiction but the non-fiction books attract just as many entries as the fiction books. So I think we can safely say that Goodreads isn’t only good for fiction. There are a good – and growing – number of non-fiction titles (some of them world-wide bestsellers) and there is certainly an audience for them. Here’s a video I posted to YouTube giving these statistics: You may also like:Einstein's Desk Was As Cluttered As Mine!Guest interview with Paula Margulies author of The Tao of Book...

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Goodreads Technical Issues

The Goodreads site is having some technical issues at the moment. Please bear with them. They are very professional and will no doubt be working frantically to fix the problem(s). Goodreads technical issues are fortunately quite rare! The main difficulty seems to be with logging in. People are seeing an error message saying that Goodreads is busy. Keep trying and you will generally get in. The other issue is being unable to rate books. You may see an error message when you click on a star to rate a book, telling you that you are not able to rate at the moment. I found that when I went to the My Books page my rating had actually registered! I hope it isn’t the popularity of my ‘Goodreads for Authors’ book that has given them these problems! I’m sure they’ll get them sorted out soon. You may also like:Goodbye To ColaAre You An...

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How to win Goodreads Giveaways

How to win Goodreads Giveaways

If you love books you may have heard of Goodreads. If not, you’re in for a wonderful surprise! It is a site specially for book lovers. One of the founders, Otis Y Chandler, really enjoyed looking at his friends’ bookshelves when he visited their houses. He was a software engineer, so decide to build a site to replicate the real world. Goodreads has thousands of virtual bookshelves. The idea is that members of the site add the books they have read, want to read, and are currently reading to their shelves. Their friends can then browse the shelves to see if there are anybooks they would like to read. There are many more features to the site than that – honestly, you could spend hours there! – but one of the most popular is the ‘Giveaways’ section. The idea behind giveaways is that publishers and authors offer paperback books as prizes in individual contests. Lots of publishers do this months before books are published (which is amazing, if you win one of those, you get to read it months before anyone else!), to generate some publcity and eagerness for the book’s release. Why would they do that? Because reviews are really important. Often, the more successful a book is, the more reviews it has. It makes sense. If you were visiting a foreign city and wanted something to eat, you probably wouldn’t choose an empty restaurant on a quiet sidestreet, but one which looked popular and thriving. It is the same with books. Sure, it’s nice to be one of the first to discover a new book or author, but in these troubled economic times, not many of us are willing to risk hard-earned cash on books we may not like. We are much more likely to buy books that our friends have read and recommended to us. Publishers know that, so they are willing to give away some copies of books in order to get good reviews. OK, so that’s half the story. The other half is how you win these contests. I found out this information when researching my book, ‘Goodreads for Authors’, which shows authors how to use the site and interact with their readers. Here’s how to win Goodreads giveaways: 1. Write Some Reviews In the Goodreads Giveaway terms & conditions, they state that: ‘If more people are interested in a book than there are copies available [which is nearly always the case], we will pick the winners at our discretion. The factors that go into our algorithm are: randomness, site activity, genre of books on your shelves, current phase of the moon, and more.’ That means that their algorithm chooses the winners, but it takes things into consideration. Bear in mind that Goodreads know that publishers are going to keep continuing to give their books as prizes in these giveaways while it works for them – that is, while they generate reviews (on Goodreads and elsewhere, such as Amazon). So it makes sense that the things that will influence their algorithm is if the people who enter the giveaway have written reviews before. They are much more likely to review the book they win than someone who has never written a review. Write some reviews of books you have read. People can be put off writing reviews, feeling it will take too long or be overly complicated. It doesn’t have to be! All you need to convey is that you enjoyed the book and would recommend it. That could be as simple as: 101 Dalmatians – “This book is so much better than the Disney version. I highly recommend it.” Mo The Talking Dog – A delight for both children and adults.” Twlight – A Parody – A clever book that pokes gentle fun at the Twilight series without causing serious offence to the fans. Very funny.” Simple. Some people write much longer reviews, and you can if you want to, but you don’t have to. As far as I can tell, the chances of winning giveaways are not improved if you write long reviews. 2. Be active on the site The Goodreads terms for giveaways mention ‘site activity’. That probably means it is less likely that you will win a giveaway if you haven’t been on the site for 6 months. Their algorithm probably deliberately chooses from people who have been active recently. What does being active mean? Just going to the site regularly (say a couple of times a week) and participating. Most things can be done with a quick click – e.g. voting in a poll, adding a book to your shelves, clicking ‘Like’ on a...

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